October 12

Frigidaire Induction Ranges: An Affordable Option

By trk

Last Updated: August 9, 2021

Frigidaire, induction range, induction stove

If you're looking for an affordable solution to your electric stove dilemmas, the Frigidaire induction range could be your answer. They no longer make the bare bones models they have in the past, but the price of their freestanding range is still very affordable. The slide-in range is also affordable compared to many other models on the market.

Probably the biggest news is the new Air Fry feature, which turns the oven into an air fryer (no special appliance needed). Though it's basically just a convection setting, it really does work.

The Frigidaire Induction Range Features At a Glance

Frigidaire Model/Price on Frigidaire Website

GCRI3058AF (Stnls) $1500
GCRI3058AD (Blk Stnls) $1600

Freestanding

FGIH3047VF $1800

Slide-In w/Front Controls

Frigidaire GCRI3058AF Induction Range
Frigidaire FGIF3047VF Slide In Induction Range

Burner Size (in.):

7/7/8.3/5.5

7/7/8.3/5.5

Burner Power (W):

2800/2800/3600/
2500

2800/2800/3600/
2500

Cooktop Lockout:

Yes

Yes

Oven Size (cu. ft.):

5.4

5.4

Start Button:

Yes

Yes

Convection Oven:

Yes

Yes

Air Fry:

Yes

Yes

Hidden Bake Element:

Yes

Yes

Delay Bake:

Yes

Yes

Broiler:

 3900W, Hi/Low: 550F/400F

3900W, Hi/Low: 550F/400F

Self-Clean:

Yes

Yes

Temp Probe:

No

No

Delay Clean:

Yes

Yes

Sabbath Mode:

No

Yes

*Frigidaire's price is going to be higher than the retailer's prices. For true prices, click through to the store sites.

Note: Some images and specification tables may not be visible on a mobile device.
FGIF3036TD/FGIF3036TF: Freestanding (w/Convection), 2 finishes
See it: HomeDepot.com

See it: Lowes

FFIF3054TD: Freestanding w/no Convection
See it: Sears

See it: Amazon

FFIF3054TS: Freestanding w/no Convection

See it: Lowes.com

Discontinued Models

You can still find FFIF3054TD on Amazon. This is the black stainless model without convection.

You can find a "scratch-and-dent" version of FFIF3054TS at AJ Madison, and a still-new version at Sears. This is the stainless model without convection. 

Why Induction? 

If you're new to induction cooking, you may have a lot of questions. Here's what we think is the most important consideration: if your only option for a range is electric, then you definitely need to consider induction. It's much better than conventional electric.

In fact, induction beats gas on most fronts, too. It's faster, more responsive, more controllable, better at holding a temperature, easier to keep clean, and safer. It's also more energy efficient because there's very little wasted or ambient heat. You may not notice much difference on your electric bill, but you will almost certainly have a cooler kitchen (very nice for those hot summer months).

Gas has always been considered the best cooking technology, and with induction comprising a tiny market segment--just 2-7%--people simply haven't been exposed to induction enough to give it a fair comparison. Many Americans still don't know what it is.

While gas is generally cheaper than electric, at least in most parts of the country, it will always be a fair competitor of induction. However, the difference in monthly expense is small, and if you're a serious cook, you owe it to yourself to learn about induction.

Especially now! The biggest objection to induction cooking has always been the cost. But with these Frigidaire induction range options, that's become much less of an issue. 

Before you decide, though, you should learn as much as you can about induction technology. Here are some articles that will help: 

Induction Cooking Pros and Cons

Is Induction Better than Gas (And If So, Why?)

Range Hoods and Induction Cooking: What You Need to Know

A Guide to the Best Induction Cookware

Wikipedia article on induction cooking

If these articles, don't answer your questions, browse through our induction archives for more information.

Here is a 30 second video from Frigidaire showing how induction works: 

If your only option is an electric stove and you're a serious cook, induction is a no-brainer. If gas is an option, you have a tougher choice--but don't rule out induction before you learn enough to make an informed decision! 

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Induction Range Options: What to Think About Before You Buy

The array of options and features on ranges today is dizzying. We think the most important considerations are size (unless you're building or remodeling, in which case you can build around whatever size range you want), basic options (common to all ranges), options exclusive to induction, and controls.

There are certainly more options to consider. Do you want programmable features? Internet connectivity? A custom color? (If you do want any of these, Frigidaire isn't the stove to get.) We're trying to help you figure out your must haves, your maybes, and what you can live without. Knowing these will help you find the best stove for you.

One more thought: it's rare to find a perfect range, or any appliance, for that matter. Unless you have it custom made or have a bottomless budget, your best choice is probably going to involve some settling. So again: it's important to your selection process to know your must haves, your maybes, and what you can live without.

It's smart to prioritize your must haves, your maybes, and what you can live without when you're range shopping, because you're not going to find a range that's got everything you want.

First Things First: Size

All Frigidaires are 30-inch ranges. They will fit in any standard 30-inch space with few or no modifications.

30-inch is the standard range size in the US. They also come in a 36-inch standard width, but these are less common, particularly in induction ranges. 

Despite this fact, not all 30-inch ranges will fit perfectly into a 30-inch space. Whichever brand you buy, you may need to make minor modifications, particularly if you're switching from a freestanding to a slide-in model. It's usually not difficult, and you can often buy kits to help make the installation easier. 

In most cases, your new range will fit right into the space you have for it. In order to make the transition as easy as possible, measure the space carefully before purchasing your new range.

Frigidaire induction range Installed

The Frigidaire induction range should fit in any standard 30-inch space.

Basic Options

Buying an induction range isn't all that different from buying any other range. Here are some of the basic considerations:

Burner size/power: Ideally your range will have powerful burners in 2-3 different sizes. What's powerful? Big burners range in power from about 3000-4000 watts. All induction burners are going to provide faster heating than gas or electric, but anything above about 3,500W is considered very powerful (and therefore very fast).

Oven Size and Dimensions: The average oven size is about 5 cubic feet, so anything above that is good; actually, anything over 4cf is probably going to be just fine for all but the most gigantic turkey. Just as important are the dimensions: you want an oven that can fit a half sheet pan, which is 18 inches by 13 inches. If your oven can fit a half sheet pan (with scant room to spare on either side), it will be able to fit any large roasting pan. 

No matter which brands you're looking at, be sure to check the oven dimensions. You'd be surprised how many ranges have tiny ovens.

Oven features: Other popular oven features include convection, self-cleaning, hidden bake element, adjustable broiler temp, smooth-glide racks, a pretty interior color, a temperature probe, an oversized window, and programmable memory options. The Frigidaire induction range ovens have all of these options except programmable memory feature.

Color: Stainless has been the dominant finish for many years now, but this is starting to change. You can now find appliances in different finishes, including black stainless, matte black, and other colors. It's also no longer considered important that all your kitchen appliances match; in fact, it's considered a bit old-fashioned. We like that there are more finish options than there were a few years ago, but you should always get what you like rather than what's "fashionable."

The Frigidaire freestanding induction range is available in stainless and black stainless. The slide-in model is available in stainless only.

Induction Options

Induction ranges can also have special features that electric and gas ranges don't, such as:

Power boost: This feature draws extra power to a burner for lightning fast heating. When in use, the power available to other burners is decreased, but you can boil a kettle of water in just a few minutes. Many induction cooktops have some increased power setting that will run for a limited time, usually 10 minutes.

Frigidaire induction ranges have a Power boost feature, shown as "P" in the digital display. After ten minutes Power Boost reverts to the high setting (showing "H" in the display).

Bridge functionality: This allows you to control two burners as one for extra large or long pans, such as griddles. On some the entire area heats up (like the Bosch Benchmark cooktop) while on others just the two burners heat up and are controlled as one unit. For some reason, bridge functionality is more common on cooktops than on ranges. 

The Frigidaire induction ranges do not have a bridge feature. 

Great low-end control: People think the lightning speed is what sets induction apart, but as great as that is, induction's true superiority lies in its ability to hold a precise temperature for long periods of time. Neither gas nor electric does this very well, usually overshooting the temp by a lot when the burner is left unattended. But induction can hold a temp indefinitely without any worry of overheating, scorching, burning, or otherwise ruining your delicate sauce, egg dish, simmering stock, etc.

The low setting ("L") on the Frigidaire induction range will keep food at a constant warm temperature of between 145F-160F; unfortunately this is not low enough to melt chocolate without scorching (that's 105F), but it's great for keeping food warm, simmering, and other low temp uses.

Controls

We probably talk more about controls than any other review site on the Internet. We do this because we think they're the most important consideration that might be overlooked, especially when buying online. There is no other single feature that's going to have a larger impact on whether day-to-day use of the range is a joy or a pain. 

In fact, our biggest issue with these Frigidaire induction ranges is the all-digital controls. All involve multiple key presses. For example, to use a burner, you must first press the On/Off key, then press the Up/Down arrow keys next to it to select the setting. 

Some induction cooktops with keypad controls have shortcuts, such as switching on to the last setting used, or to the Medium setting. The Frigidaires don't have this. You have to use both keys--On/Off and Up/Down--to set a burner to the desired temp.

Here's the Frigidaire control panel:

Frigidaire Induction Range Control panel

On the other hand, many induction ranges and cooktops, including premium brands like Bosch and Thermador, have controls right on the cooktop itself, underneath the glass. This is a sleek look, but it can result in huge frustrations because if the glass is wet--for example if something boiled over or you dripped a bit when setting a kettle on the cooktop--the settings can change arbitrarily.

Having the controls on a panel is preferable to this, in our opinion. We wish these ranges had manual controls (knobs) for the cooktop, but those are hard to find these days, and are only going to get harder as we move away from mechanical and towards electronic and computerized appliances.

The oven settings are used less frequently and don't demand the quick changes that the cooktop sometimes does, so they're not as much of an issue. (This is why some ranges have keypads for the ovens, but still have manual dials for the cooktop.) 

Manufacturers have dealt with the digital controls issue in a lot of different ways. GE, for example, has come up with a "finger-swipe" control that closely replicates turning a dial (read about it in our Induction Stove Reviews). 

The Frigidaire freestanding model has controls on the back of the range, and the slide-in model has the controls on the front of the stove, but the controls are the same for both models. There are advantages and disadvantages to both styles: controls in the back are harder to reach, especially when you've got hot pots going on the cooktop--but they're safer because they can't be inadvertently changed. Controls in the front are easier to use, but they can be accidentally changed rather easily; you can use the "lockout" feature to prevent this from happening, but that extra step can be a pain to use.

Another issue we have with the all-digital control panel is that there's more to go wrong. Electronic control panels are cheaper to manufacture, which is one reason why they're becoming so ubiquitous in the appliance world, but they're delicate. In fact, electronics are one of the most common reasons for service calls on new appliances. And if the electronics fail out of warranty, they can be expensive to repair: some cost almost as much as replacing the whole appliance.

Many people prefer digital controls because they look more modern. (Which, we agree, they do.) And it's true that you'll get used to the controls your stove has whatever they are. We just want you to think about it because if it may mean the difference between loving your new induction stove--or hating it. 

Before you pay for all those extra features, make sure you'll use them; before you settle for an all-digital control panel, make sure you won't hate it.

Freestanding Vs. Slide-in Ranges

There are two basic styles of ranges/stoves: freestanding and slide-in.

Freestanding stoves are finished on both sides so they can be installed on the end of a counter. They also have the controls in the back, above the burners:

Frigidaire Induction Range Reviews

Slide-in stoves do not have finished sides, though you can often buy a kit to finish them if a side will be exposed. Slide-ins have the controls on the front, at the cooktop level:

Frigidaire FGIF3047VF Slide In Induction Range

There are pros and cons to each design. Freestanding stoves are usually less expensive, and the controls can't be inadvertently changed by leaning or spilling on the stove top. Slide-ins are more expensive, but they are currently the most popular style because they look more customized, and because many people want to show off their pretty backsplash, which the freestanding stove is going to hide more.

Frigidaire makes a freestanding and a slide-in model. Most people probably prefer the looks of the slide-in model, but it is several hundred dollars more.

Internet Connectivity

Some ranges now have bluetooth and/or Wifi Internet connectivity so you can control some functions from your smart phone or through a home smart device like Alexa. Right now, that generally means pairing a cooktop or range to a hood that comes on automatically when you switch on a burner. (There will probably be more functionality in the future.)

These Frigidaires do not offer Internet connectivity, so we won't spend a whole lot of time talking about it. We just wanted to say that, as cool as it is, it's just another potentially expensive thing to go wrong (and it's questionable how much use you'll get out of it).

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About the Appliance Industry

Fierce competition in the appliance industry has created a market very different from the one that existed a generation ago. Today, appliances are considered to have a roughly 10 year life span--nothing like the stove your mother or grandmother may have had for 30 or 40 years!

More importantly, few warranties extend beyond a year. Therefore, we strongly recommend that whoever you buy from, you also purchase an extended warranty. 

Another important aspect, especially when buying online from a retailer who may not have a store in your town, is to make sure you have competent service technicians in your area. Such service is no longer a given with any appliance retailer because fierce competition has forced them to cut services to remain competitive. So even if you buy from a local dealer, make sure you can get a certified technician should you need a service call.

As a buyer, you have to make sure you're covered. While we believe that customer service is going to get better as the global marketplace becomes the norm, it's at a dismal low point right now across the appliance industry.

So make sure you get good post-sale service by buying the extended warranty and ensuring there are service technicians in your area who can work on an induction range.

How to do this? Ask. Any reputable seller should have a toll-free customer service number you can call. If you're buying from Amazon, click on the seller's link at the top of the listing, usually just under the product name, as shown here: 

Frigidaire Induction Range Reviews: Amazon seller diagram

Click the link and if there's no info, then google for their website--if you can't find it, or if it doesn't have a toll-free customer service number, then find another seller.

No matter who you buy from, protect your purchase by 1) getting an extended warranty, and 2) making sure there are competent service technicians in your area who are familiar with induction technology.

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About Frigidaire

Frigidaire is owned by Electrolux, a Swedish-based corporation. (So if you thought Frigidaire was an American company--nope, not anymore.) Electrolux makes a wide range of appliances meant to appeal to many different market segments. 

Frigidaire's affordable induction ranges are one of their newer offerings, and this is by design. About 10 years ago, Electrolux lowered the price of some of their European induction offerings to make induction a more attractive option. This was wildly successful: it increased the percentage of induction cooktops and ranges in European homes from about 5% to an astonishing 50%. 

This is exactly what Frigidaire is trying to do now in the US with these affordable induction ranges. 

If you want to read more about this, check out this article in Digital Trends.

How to Buy Appliances Online

Many people are skittish about buying appliances online. However, like smart appliances and digital controls, buying online is the wave of the future. There are a lot of pluses to online buying as long as you're smart about how you do it. 

We go into more detail about this topic in other articles, so we won't repeat it all here. Instead, click over to one of these articles for more tips on how to be a savvy online buyer (it opens in a new tab so you won't lose your place):

How to Buy Online: Teach Yourself About Technical Products and Get What You Can Truly Love

Can You Trust Amazon Reviews?

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Putting the Frigidaire Induction Range Through Its Paces: How Is It to Use?

Using the range was a bit of a mixed bag. (We talk more about this below in the "What We Liked" and "What We Didn't Like" sections.) Here's the control panel:

Frigidaire Gallery Induction Range Control Panel 2021

The all-digital controls were somewhat cumbersome, especially for the cooktop (for the oven, speed is less important). First you have to switch the burner on, then you have to press Plus and Minus keys to reach a setting. We prefer the finger swipe on the GE or even having all the settings showing, like on the Bosch, instead of having to scroll through a menu. Having a few shortcut keys--such as "Warm" or "Boost" would be nice, too. But you'll get used to what you have. And the good thing is that it's easy to switch off a burner if you have to.

We also weren't crazy about all the key pressing in the freestanding model when we had pans going on the stove. If you've got boiling pasta going, you have to be careful not to get a steam burn on your arm when you change a setting (don't ask how we know this). For this reason, we preferred the slide-in model with the controls on the front of the stove. But for several hundred dollars more, you may be willing to live with the controls on the back of the freestanding model.

Other than the somewhat clunky cooktop controls, we have few complaints. The cooktop is powerful and fast and everything worked great. Keep in mind that the Keep Warm function operates at about 145F, so it's not low enough to melt chocolate (it will scorch). But great for most other things.

The oven is awesome. The Quick Preheat was super fast, taking a little over 10 minutes to reach 350F. (By the way, 350F is the default preheat setting, which is a nice shortcut feature, but it's also easy to change that temp using the numeric keypad). Baking--both with and without convection--was fairly even, and better than most ovens (totally even heating is the holy grail for ovens and we haven't found a perfect one yet). And, all the oven functions do what they're supposed to do, and are easy to use. The oven is large enough for anything you can throw at it and the settings and numeric keypad (used for setting the timer, for example) was pretty straightforward and easy to use. 

The lowest oven setting is 170F, which is great. The highest setting is 550F, which is pretty standard.

You're probably wondering about the new Air Fry feature: yes, it works: you can use this in lieu of buying an air fryer and will probably be happy with the results. We did a big batch of chicken wings and they got good and crispy. The Air Fry is really just a glorified convection feature, but if it does what you want it to, who cares?

If you're really into air frying, you can buy a special Air Fry basket for about $60. Unfortunately, it does not come with the range. (You also have to buy a broiler tray separately--pretty standard across the appliance industry.)

Overall, our experience using the Frigidaire induction range was...mixed. It did everything we wanted to do, which was excellent, but the clunky controls weren't our favorites. 

Specifications

NOTE: Some specifications may not be visible in mobile view.

Frigidaire Gallery Freestanding Induction Range (GCRI3058AF/AD):

Frigidaire GCRI3058AF Induction Range

Stainless.

Frigidaire GCRI3058AD Induction Range

Black stainless.

See both models at AJ Madison

See Stainless model at Home Depot (GCRI3058AF)

See Black Stainless model at Home Depot (GCRI3058AD)

Here's the cooktop. It's a little hard to see, but the two burners on the left are the same size, the largest burner is in the front on the right, and the smallest is right-rear:

Frigidaire Freestanding Induction Range Top View

Cooktop and Oven Specifications for Frigidaire Freestanding Induction Range 

(GCRI3058AF/AD)

Cooktop:

Design/Color

Stainless steel (AF), Black stainless steel (AD)

Control Type/Location

Digital keypad/rear panel above cooktop

Left Front Burner (size/power)

7 inches/2800W

Left Rear Burner (size/power)

7 inches/2800W

Right Front Burner (size/power)

9 inches/3600W

Right Rear Burner (size/power)

5.5 inches/2500W

Burner Settings

10 heat levels, including Keep Warm and Power Boost

Cooktop Lock

Yes

Oven:

Oven Size

5.4 cubic feet

Oven Dimensions (HxWxD)

19.75 x 24.375 x 19.125

Convection (True convection)

Yes

Self-Cleaning

Yes

Delay Cleaning

Yes

Broiler Settings High/Low

(note: broiler pan not included)

550F/400F

Oven Interior Color

Blue

Rack Positions

Door Lock

Yes

Temperature Probe

No

Hidden Bake Element

Yes

Window Oven

Extra Large Visualite™ window

Lower Drawer

Storage

"My Favorite" Function

Yes

Sabbath Mode

No

Frigidaire Gallery Slide-in Induction Range (FGIH3047VF)

Frigidaire FGIF3047VF Slide In Induction Range

Cooktop and Oven Specifications for Frigidaire Freestanding Induction Range 

(FGIH3047VF)

Cooktop:

Design/Color

Stainless steel

Control Type/Location

Digital keypad on front of range

Left Front Burner (size/power)

7 inches/2800W

Left Rear Burner (size/power)

7 inches/2800W

Right Front Burner (size/power)

8.3 inches/3600W

Right Rear Burner (size/power)

5.5 inches/2500W

Burner Settings

10 heat levels, including Keep Warm and Power Boost

Cooktop Lock

Yes

Oven:

Oven Size

5.4 cubic feet

Oven Dimensions (HxWxD)

19.75 x 24.375 x 19.125

Convection (True convection)

Yes

Self-Cleaning

Yes

Delay Cleaning

Yes

Broiler Settings High/Low

(note: broiler pan not included)

550F/400F

Oven Interior Color

Slate Blue

Rack Positions

Door Lock

Yes

Temperature Probe

No

Hidden Bake Element

Yes

Window Oven

Extra Large Visualite™ window

Lower Drawer

Storage

"My Favorite" Function

Yes

Sabbath Mode

Yes

Installation Specifications (Both Models)

Installation Specifications

GCRI3058AF/AD

FGIH3047VF

Electrical Hookup

240V/40 amps (standard)

240V/40 amps (standard)

Dimensions (WxDxH in.)

29.875x25.75x36.125

29.875x25.75x36.625

Total Depth w/Door Open (in.)

48.625

48.625

Power Cord

Not included

Not included

Safety

  • Automatic pan size detection
  • Automatic burner shutoff with 3-minute delay 
  • Hot surface indicator lights
  • UL listed.

Warranty

1 year limited manufacturer warranty.

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What We Like About the Frigidaire Induction Ranges

There's a lot to like here! Here are our favorite features about these induction ranges:

  • Fast and powerful cooktop.
  • Large oven.
  • The Air Fry feature really works.
  • The True Convection is a huge improvement over their old models (though still not perfect).
  • Overall, a lot of features for the price.

What We Don't Like About the Frigidaire Induction Ranges

These ranges have induction every bit as powerful as more expensive brands and are a great, affordable way to get into induction.

But they're not perfect. Here are some of the drawbacks:

  • The all-digital controls can be slow, esp. for the cooktop.
  • The control panel is not intuitive and takes awhile to figure out.
  • The convection is better, but it's not as even as some other ranges we've tested.

Also there have been a few complaints about serious electrical issues: so we remind you to please, please buy the extended warranty!

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Recommendation

The Frigidaire Gallery Freestanding Induction Range ($1200, slightly more for the black stainless model) and the Gallery Slide-in ($1800) are a lot of stove for the money, including Power Boost on the cooktop and an oven with true convection plus the cool Air Fry feature that eliminates the need to buy an air fryer. (It's really just a convection setting, but it works.)

Our biggest complaint is the all-digital control panel that took awhile to figure out and can be slow to use when you need it to be fast. But if you are on a tight budget and want an induction range, this freestanding model is a great choice.

Both models get good reviews and come recommended by many users, with an average rating of about 4.5 out of 5. 

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Final Thoughts on Frigidaire Induction Ranges

Frigidaire induction ranges are some of the most affordable options on the market, but they perform well, have a good record for reliability, and offer a lot for your investment. We think they're a great choice for anyone on a budget--or even if you're not.

Thanks for reading!

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  1. I will NEVER purchase another Frigidaire product. My last Frigidaire stove was in great shape after 15 years. Except that the burners began to turn on randomly. Nearly burned my house down. It turned out there was a recall 6 months after my purchase. Frigidaire let me risk my family’s life for 15 years.

    Frigidaire offered me a “rebate” toward a new purchase. Having cooked on induction before I chose induction. I purchased all new cast iron pots and pans to cook on. Frigidaire claims autosizing of burners to match your pans. The graphic on the top even show three DISTINCT zones on each burner. You will be SORRY to know that the ONLY element that works is the 4.5 or so inch diameter element…..unless you have a pan of the EXACT dimension to cause the larger zone to activate. I mean EXACT, I was just told by their tech that larger or smaller will not work at all.

    I now own USELESS cast iron ware that can not evenly heat at all on the product. a 9 inch indicated ring will not heat an 8.5 inch tangent to surface 11 inch pan. DO not bother with the GARBAGE that Frigidaire sells. You will be sorry.

    As to the oven…the idiots in engineering decided to place the heating coil in the BACK of the over instead of bottom, defying thermodynamics and physics. The oven ONLY WORKS in a mode very similar to convection….so if you want to bake a pizza forget it. IT will not work properly. In fact i get better pizza from my bbq! Baking bread worked great in the oven…as long as I bake my bread INSIDE one of my cast iron pots with the lid on.
    Summation:
    Garbage functionally, poor engineering, useless auto-sizing and fraud upon its face in advertising. If anyone wants to make a class action I am in!

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