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Zwilling Knives Review: A Detailed Look at Zwilling Kitchen Knives

By trk

Last Updated: July 30, 2023

German knife brands, kitchen knife reviews, kitchen knives, Zwilling knives

Zwilling J.A. Henckels makes several lines knives, from very high end Japanese blades to affordable stamped lines. This review looks at the Zwilling lines only--we will review J. A. Henckels knives in another article (but we do explain the differences between the Zwilling and J.A. Henckels brands).


Table Of Contents

Zwilling Knives at a Glance

Zwilling makes several lines of knives, and we are not including the J.A. Henckels or Miyabi lines (we discuss those lines in other reviews). 

Because there are so many, we divided the Zwilling lines into three groups:

  • Forged
  • Premium Forged, and
  • Stamped. 

The three tables below summarize the Zwilling lines. They are listed in alphabetical order in each table.

Because there are so many lines, we aren't going to review all of them in detail. Instead, we're picking one or two of the best options for forged, forged premium, and stamped lines. But if have different priorities than we do, there is enough information in the table for each line for you to pick your preference.

Not all the lines have the same pieces, but they all have a standard 8-inch chef's knife (except one), so we use that knife to compare prices. 

Knives with asterisks have more detailed reviews below.

Zwilling updates their lineup and prices frequently, so note that the lines listed here may not be current and that the prices given are approximate. 

Zwilling Forged Knives

Zwilling Line

Features

Zwilling Diplome chef's knife

-FC61 Japanese steel

-HRC 61

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang

-10 degree double cutting edge

-Honbazuke hand finished blade

-Contoured POM handle

-Japanese style/shape

-Made in Seki, Japan

-8" chef's knife about $100.

Zwilling Pro chef's knife
Zwilling Pro le Blanc chef's knife

-German high carbon stainless steel

-HRC 57 Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang

-15 degree double cutting edge (10 deg/santoku)

-Laser controlled blade edge (superior sharpness)

-Contoured POM handle

-Made in Solingen, Germany

-Pro S (le Blanc) have slimmer blades and handles

-One of Zwilling's most popular lines

-8" chef's knife about $160.

*Pro Holm Oak

(Pro line w/oak handle)

see at Amazon

see at Zwilling

Zwilling Pro Holm Oak chef's knife

-German high carbon stainless steel

-HRC 57 Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang

-15 degree double cutting edge

-Laser controlled blade edge (superior sharpness)

-Contoured holm oak handle

-Made in Solingen, Germany

-8" chef's knife about $160.

Zwilling Professional S chef's knife

-German high carbon stainless steel

-HRC 57, Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, full bolster and full tang

-15 degree double cutting edge (10 deg/santoku)

-Laser controlled blade edge (superior sharpness)

-Contoured polymer (synthetic) handle

-Made in Solingen Germany

-8" chef's knife about $160.

Zwilling 4 Star chef's knife

-German high carbon stainless steel

-HRC 57 Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang (concealed)

-15 degree double cutting edge (10 deg/santoku)

-Laser controlled blade edge (superior sharpness)

-Contoured polypropylene handle

-Made in Solingen, Germany

-One of Zwilling's most popular knives

-8" chef's knife about $140.

Twin 4 Star II (upgraded 4 Star w/end cap)

see at Amazon

see at Zwilling

Zwilling Twin 4 Star II chef's knife

-German high carbon stainless steel

-HRC 58, Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, full bolster, full tang

-15 degree double cutting edge (10 deg/santoku)

-Laser controlled blade edge (superior sharpness)

-Contoured polypropylene handle w/steel end cap

-Made in Solingen, Germany

-8" chef's knife about $120.

Zwilling Twin Fin chef's knife

-Nitro 60 high carbon stainless steel

-HRC 60, Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade

-9-12 degree double cutting edge

-Blade welded to stainless steel handle

-Made in Seki, Japan

-8" chef's knife about $100.

Zwilling Premium Forged Knives

Zwilling Line

Features

Zwilling Twin 1731 chef's knife

-Cronidur 30 steel blade

-HRC 60, Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang

-12.5 degree double cutting edge

-Laser controlled bladed edge (superior sharpness)

-Contoured ziricote hardwood handle

-Made in Germany, designed by Matteo Thun

-8" chef's knife about $500.

Zwilling Kramer Euroline 2.0 chef's knife

-52100 carbon steel

-HRC 61, special hardening process

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang

-9-12 degree double cutting edge

-3 step hand finished blade, extra wide for knuckle clearance

-Contoured Micarta handle w/brass spacers

-Made in Seki, Japan

-8" chef's knife about $350.

Zwillimg Kramer Euroline Damascus chef's knife

-SG2 (MC63) micro carbide steel core w/100 layer Damascus overlay

-HRC 63, Cryodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang

-9-12 degree double cutting edge

-3 step hand finished blade, extra wide for knuckle clearance

-Contoured Micarta handle

-Made in Seki, Japan

-8" chef's knife about $400.

Zwilling Kramer Meiji chef's knife

-FC61 fine carbon steel core with 100 layers of steel/nickel Damascus overlay

-HRC 61, Friodur hardened blade

-Forged blade, partial bolster, full tang

-9-12 degree double cutting edge

-Honbazuke hand finished blade, extra wide for knuckle clearance

-Pakkawood handle shaped to fit palm

-Made in Seki, Japan

-8" chef's knife about $250.

Zwilling Stamped Knives

Zwilling Line

Features

Zwilling Gourmet chef's knife

-German high carbon stainless steel

-HRC 57, Friodur hardened

-Stamped blade, no bolster, full tang

-15 degree double cutting edge

-Laser controlled blade edge (superior sharpness)

-Contoured POM (plastic) handle

-Made in Solingen, Germany

-8" chef's knife about $70.

Zwilling Now S chef's knife

-Zwilling Special Formula High Carbon No Stain steel

-HRC 57, Friodur hardened

-Stamped blade, no bolster, full tang

-15 degree double cutting edge

-Ergonomic, non-slip polypropylene handle in blue, green and red, w/end cap

-Made in Solingen, Germany

-Zwilling's most affordable line 

-8" chef's knife about $60.

Zwilling Twin Gourmet chef's knife

-Zwilling Special Formula High Carbon No Stain steel

-HRC 57, Friodur hardened

-Stamped blade, no bolster, full tang

-15 degree double cutting edge

-Contoured plastic handle

-Made in Spain

-Chef's knife about $60.

Zwilling Twin Grip Paring Knives

-Stainless steel paring knife collection

-HRC 54-57, Friodur hardened

-Stamped blade, no bolster

-Contoured slip-free plastic handle

-Made in Spain

-Average about $7 per knife.

Zwilling Twin Signature chef's knife

-Zwilling Special Formula High Carbon No Stain steel

-HRC 57, Friodur hardened

-Stamped blade, no bolster, full tang (exposed)

-15 degree double cutting edge

-Contoured plastic handle

-Made in Germany

-8" chef's knife about $90.

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About Zwilling

The Zwilling trademark was registered in 1731, meaning that this company is almost 300 years old. They have been designing and producing high quality knives for this long, making Zwilling one of the oldest and most distinguished knife makers in the world. The company still makes knives in Solingen, Germany, the "City of Blades" known for producing exceptional cutlery. 

Today, Zwilling is owned by the German conglomerate Zwilling J.A. Henckels. They produce kitchen knives and own several kitchen product companies including Ballarini, Staub, and (our favorite) Demeyere. 

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Zwilling Vs. Henckels: What's the Difference?

Zwilling J.A. Henckels is a parent company, with Zwilling and Henckels being separate knife manufacturers. Zwilling is the higher-end brand and Henckels knives is the value brand.

It can be confusing because you'll often see Zwilling knives called "Henckels" or "Zwilling-Henckels" on Amazon and at other retailers, and Henckels knives labeled "Zwilling" or "Zwilling-Henckels" as well. Fortunately, there is an easy way to tell the difference, and that is by the logo. 

Zwilling means "twin" in German, and the Zwilling logo is two figures. The Henckels logo is one figure:

Zwilling logo

Zwilling logo.

Henckels logo

Henckels logo.

You can see the Zwilling logo on every Zwilling blade, such as this Diplome:

Zwilling logo on knife callout

Henckels knives will have the one-figure logo.

Quality-wise, Zwilling is the better knife. Most Zwilling knives are made in Germany or Japan, while Henckels knives are made in China, India, Thailand, and Spain. Most Zwilling knives are forged, while most Henckels knives are stamped. The steel used is probably the same, but Zwilling steel is cryo-treated to improve strength and edge retention.  

Both Zwilling and Henckels produce several lines of knives, but they are meant to appeal to different buyers. Once again, Zwilling is the high end brand, while Henckels is the affordable brand. If you want Zwilling, look for the twin figure logo on the blade.

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Helpful Terminology

Knife Parts Diagram

This section contains definitions for terminology you may not be familiar with. 

Bolster: The handle end of a knife blade that provides a balancing point between the blade and the handle and also provides protection for your fingers. A kitchen knife can have a full bolster, which extends down to the cutting edge/heel, a partial bolster which goes halfway down or less, or no bolster, which is usually the case with stamped knives. We prefer a partial bolster over the full bolster shown above, primarily because it makes it easier to sharpen the whole blade of the knife. A partial bolster can also reduce the weight of the knife, resulting in a different balance and overall feel; you should try both partial and full bolster knives before you decide which one feels best to you.

Cryodur: One of two ice-hardening processes used by Zwilling to ensure a blade’s long-lasting sharpness. The steel is heated, then cooled/quenched to room temperature, then frozen and hardened at -196F.

Damascus: Steel that's been folded into several layers--sometimes hundreds of layers--which enhances strength and provides a beautiful appearance. Damascus steel is usually an overlay of protective steel that protects the core cutting edge of the knife that is typically a harder, more brittle steel. The Zwilling Kramer Euroline knives have a Damascus overlay.

FC61 Steel: FC61 steel is a fine-grained martensitic stainless steel with carbon and chromium as its main elements. It is Zwilling J.A. Henckels proprietary name for Sandvik 13C26 Steel and is seen on the Zwilling Kramer Meiji knives and the Zwilling Diplome knife.

Friodur: Zwilling J.A. Henckels proprietary four-step ice-hardening process includes freezing the steel to -94F to produce an exceptionally hard, tough and corrosion resistant blade that is very sharp and has great edge retention (from this document).

Gyuto: A gyuto is the Japanese version of the traditional Western chef's knife. They're used for similar purposes but the gyuto has a flatter blade--for slicing rather than rocking motion cutting. 

Honbazuke: Japanese for “true cutting edge,” this is the three-step honing process that gives Japanese blades their exceptional sharpness. Each step of this traditional technique is done by hand. Blades are coarsely ground with a vertically rotating whetstone, fine-honed with a horizontal rotating whetstone, then polished using a leather belt. Combined with a traditional Japanese 9.5-12 degree edge angle, Honbazuke makes knives remarkably sharp (from the Zwilling/Miyabi website). You'll see this finish on several Zwilling knives made in Seki, Japan.

HRC: The Rockwell hardness rating of a knife. Good quality German knives are rated around 56-58, and most Japanese knives tend to be 60-62. The higher the rating, the harder the steel and the longer a knife will hold its edge--but harder blades are also more brittle and prone to chipping. Which steel you prefer comes down to cooking style and personal taste. 

Micarta: This is a knife handle made of linen, paper, or other material combined with thermoset resin. Very comfortable grip and durable construction. Seen in some of the Zwilling Kramer knife handles.

Pakkawood: Pakkawood is a wood/resin composite handle material seen typically on Japanese knives. It is a combination of layered wood and resin (plastic) that makes for a solid, durable, bacteria-resistant handle. The Zwilling Kramer Meiji has a pakkawood handle.

Polypropylene: Synthetic handle material that is lighter and less durable than POM. Seen on lower-cost knife lines, although some people prefer the feel of polypropylene to that of POM: it's a little softer and more slip-resistant than POM. 

POM: POM is polyoxymethylene, a hard, thermoplastic synthetic with extreme durability and resistance to damage from heat and cold. POM is resistant to bacteria, making it a hygienic choice. POM handles are seen on higher-end knives (Zwilling Pro, most Wusthof lines) because it's more durable than other types of plastic. Several Zwilling knives have POM handles. 

SG2 Steel (MC63): Also known as Super Gold 2, SG2 is a high carbon stainless steel developed by the Takefu Steel Company. It is used mainly in Japanese kitchen cutlery (source). MC63 is Zwilling J.A. Henckel's proprietary version of SG2 steel. This steel has a hardness rating of 63 HRC, is highly corrosion resistant, will hold an edge for a long time (compared to many other kitchen knife steels), and is even fairly easy to sharpen due to their "fine grain microstructure" (source). The Zwilling Kramer Euroline Damascus knife has an SG2 core (meaning the cutting edge).

Tang: The tang is the non-visible part of the knife blade that extends into the handle. A full tang knife has a blade that extends all the way to the butt of the knife; a partial (or "rabbet") tang extends partially down the handle. Full tang knives have traditionally been considered the highest quality, though some good quality brands use a partial tang to lighten a knife and give it a different center of balance. So a full tang is good, but a partial tang isn't necessarily bad. All Miyabi knives have a full tang. 

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About Zwilling Steel

All the steel used in German-style Zwilling knives is German high carbon stainless steel. This is the standard steel used for all knives (of all brands) made in Solingen, Germany.

Zwilling Japanese-style knives use fancier steels that are harder, which is typical of Japanese knives. The Zwilling knives made in Seki, Japan can have blades made of FC61, SG2, Nitro 60, SG2, Cronidur 30, and 52100 steel. While the names aren't that important (unless you're a knife nerd), they all mean one thing: a harder steel than that found on German-made knives.

Which type of steel is best? It depends on what you're looking for. German high carbon stainless is an excellent knife steel, and results in knives with a hardness rating of 56-58. These are extremely durable blades that will hold an edge for a long time and last for decades. 

The Japanese steels also produce excellent knives, with a hardness rating of 60-63. This is extremely hard steel, and while it will hold an edge for a really long time without sharpening, it is also more brittle, so it should not be used on hard foods. Doing so can chip the edges. 

All Zwilling knife steel is excellent, so the choice is purely about personal preference.

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About Zwilling Handles

Zwilling uses several materials for their German knife handles. Probably the most common one  is POM, a hard, extremely durable plastic that is bacteria resistant and impervious to heat and cold. POM is kind of the industry standard for German knife handles and is seen on many brands made in Solingen, Germany, including Zwilling and Wusthof.

Zwilling also uses polypropylene, which is a softer, less durable plastic but one that feels good in the hand and provides excellent slip-resistance. Polypropylene is usually seen on the more affordable Zwilling lines, including several of their stamped lines; it's also seen on some forged lines.

A few Zwilling lines have wooden handles, like the oak handle seen on the Pro Holm Oak line. Wood handles are beautiful, but often not as durable or hygienic as synthetic handles.

You'll see even more materials on the Zwilling knives made in Japan, including pakkawood and Micarta, which are both composites made of wood, paper, or other materials mixed with resin (another type of synthetic). These composite handles are durable, comfortable, and hygienic, and many of them look like wood, so they can also be beautiful.

Finally, the Zwilling Twin Fin has a stainless steel handle that provides a clean, modern look. It's actually a great handle, both comfortable and hygienic, which you should try if you're in the market for a modern-looking knife or a Japanese-style blade. 

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Our Picks for Best Zwilling Knives

Here are our Zwilling favorites. These are by no means the only Zwilling knives you should look at, but we picked them because we liked the design: partial or no bolsters, excellent steel quality, and great handles (i.e., comfortable and durable). If you prefer a full bolster, look at the Professional S and Twin Star lines (see their info in the tables at the beginning of this review).

Best Overall Zwilling Line: Zwilling Pro (All of Them)

Zwilling Pro chef's knife

Zwilling Pro chef's knife.

Zwilling Pro le Blanc chef's knife

Zwilling Pro S le Blanc chef's knife--note slimmer blade and handle.

Zwilling Pro Holm Oak chef's knife

Zwilling Pro Holm--same as the Pro but with oak handle.

  • Made from German high carbon stainless steel
  • HRC 57
  • Friodur hardened blade
  • Forged blade
  • Partial bolster
  • Full tang, exposed
  • 15 degree double cutting edge (10 deg double edge on santoku)
  • Laser controlled blade edge for superior sharpness and edge retention
  • Contoured POM or oak handle with three rivets
  • Made in Solingen, Germany
  • 8-inch chef's knife weighs 9.3 ounces; 8-inch Pro S chef's knife weighs 8.6 ounces.

The Zwilling Pro is a traditional German-style knife with some excellent features that make this one of Zwilling's most popular and best-selling lines. Things we love about this knife include the curved, partial bolster that makes a pinch grip incredibly comfortable and with less hand strain.

We also love that the partial bolster makes the blade easier to sharpen than the Professional S line, which has a full bolster:

Zwilling Pro chef's knife with bolster callout

Zwilling Pro/Pro Slim/Pro Holm Oak: partial bolster.

Zwilling Pro S chef's knife with bolster callout

Zwilling Professional S: flat, full bolster.

(If you're a fan of a full bolster, then you should be looking at the Professional S rather than the Pro, Pro Slim, Pro le Blanc, or Pro Holm Oak. The Professional S is a different knife than the Pro, Pro Slim, and Pro Holm Oak, mainly because of the full bolster--see images above or the first table of Zwilling Forged Knives for more detailed information.)

The Pro series has been so successful that Zwilling has added a few more options to the Pro line: the Pro Slim, le Blanc, and the Pro Holm Oak. 

The Pro Slim (sometimes confusingly called the Pro S, which is a different knife than the Professional S) has the same blade and handle shape but both are slimmer, for a lighter knife: for the standard 8-inch chef's knife, the difference is about 0.7 ounces, or just under half a pound. If you have small hands or prefer a lighter blade, this is a significant difference. The Pro Slim knives are available only as chef's knives, as far as we can tell.

The le Blanc Pro lines are just Pro and Pro Slim knives with a white handle. 

The Pro Holm Oak series is identical to the original Pro line but with holm oak handles. These are beautiful knives, but the handle is different, so the knife has a different feel in balance and cutting. 

Prices for all the Pro knives are about the same.

Zwilling says their Pro line is "the most user-friendly knife available to market." 

ZWILLING Pro is the most user-friendly knife available to market. The unique blade shape and ergonomic bolster are the result of years of experience in knife making, and the rigorous study of how knives are used. A unique curved bolster supports the professional pinch grip, with thumb and index finger on the blade, for safe cutting and less fatigue. The Chef's Knife blade was redesigned with a broader curve in the front to facilitate the rocking motion of Western cutting, while the straight back is ideal for the Asian chopping motion. The full length of the blade can be used when cutting and can be sharpened from bolster to tip. Designed in Italy by Matteo Thun and made in Germany by ZWILLING J.A. Henckels, the company that sets the standard for exceptional cutlery worldwide. Set includes 4" Paring Knife, 5.5" Prep Knife, 8" Bread Knife, 8" Chef's Knife, TWIN Shears, TWIN Sharpening Steel, and 16 Slot Hardwood Block.

Using the Zwilling Pro

The Pro chef's knife has a broader belly curve for the rocking motion of Western knives, but is also great for the chopping motion used in Asian cooking. This makes it a great all-around chef's knife for cooks with many different styles. And as we said, the curved partial bolster gives this knife about the best pinch grip you can imagine. 

The knives have good edge retention, with 57 HRC hardness rating, so they're really just great all-around knives. Everyone Western cook needs a knife like the Zwilling Pro in their kitchen.

Who Is this Knife For?

Everybody needs a knife like the Zwilling Pro to chop through hard foods and bones as well as veggie prep, herbs, and most other all-around kitchen tasks. If you have small hands or want a lighter all-purpose knife, go with the Pro Slim line. But in all honesty, this is a great all-purpose knife that you will get a ton of use from.

Available Knives

Another great thing about the Zwilling Pro is that the line is huge. It includes chef's knives in a few sizes, bread knives, santoku and nakiri knives (with a 10 degree double edge), a few different paring knives, and more, plus several sets, from a two piece chef's/paring knife set all the way up to a 16 piece block that includes steak knives. Our pick for a set would be the 7 piece block, which has all the essentials, plus a lot of slots for customization--and all the Pro lines will fit in a Pro block, so you can pick and choose from the different Pro lines if you want to. 

Zwilling Pro 7pc knife block set

buy zwilling Pro knives:

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Zwilling Pro le Blanc chef's knife

buy zwilling Pro S/le blanc knives:

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Zwilling Pro Holm Oak chef's knife

buy zwilling pro holm oak knives:

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Best Zwilling Japanese Blade: Diplome

Zwilling Diplome chef's knife

See Diplome line at Amazon

See Diplome line at Zwilling

8-inch chef's knife about $100

Features 

  • FC61 Japanese steel
  • HRC 61
  • Forged blade
  • Partial bolster
  • Full tang
  • 10 degree double cutting edge
  • Honbazuke hand finished blade
  • Contoured POM handle (hard plastic), triple riveted
  • Japanese style blade shape with Western handle
  • Made in Seki, Japan
  • 8-inch chef's knife weighs 7.2 ounces.

For the Diplome line, Zwilling teamed up with chefs from Le Cordon Bleu cooking school to design the perfect professional chef's knife. What they came up with was a Japanese-style blade--a thinner gyuto rather than a wider German chef's knife--with a thin cutting angle and very hard steel that will keep an edge through long hours of prep work.

Diplomes are also very well balanced, which helps to keep hand strain to a minimum. The handles are more Western than Japanese--meaning contoured for grip--which is what most professional chefs in the Western world prefer. 

Also, the handles are made from hard plastic POM, the traditional handle material for German style knives. This material is extremely durable and completely hygienic: it won't harbor any bacteria like some wooden handles can, another feature that makes this knife restaurant quality (you can't use wooden-handled knives in restaurants because of the bacteria issue). 

Using the Zwilling Diplome

It's closer to a Miyabi in style and cutting performance than a Zwilling (and probably made in the Miyabi factory--Zwilling owns Miyabi). If you like a thinner gyuto blade, you'll love how this knife cuts. 

Who Is the Zwilling Diplome For?

The Diplome was designed for professional chefs, so if you want a blade that's good enough for professional chefs at Le Cordon Bleu, give the Diplome a try. Be sure you don't mind the narrower blade, which limits the rocking-style cutting motion you can do with it.

Available Knives

The Diplome is available as a chef's knife (three sizes), fillet knife, bread knife, boning knife, santoku, carving knife, and a few different paring knives. Availability seems limited right now (early spring 2023), but Zwilling promises that will change in the near future.

Zwilling Diplome chef's knife

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Most Modern Design: Twin Fin

Zwilling Twin Fin chef's knife

See Twin Fin line at Amazon 

See Twin Fin line at Zwilling

8-inch chef's knife about $100

Features 

  • Nitro 60 high carbon stainless steel (Japanese steel)
  • HRC 60
  • Friodur hardened blade
  • Forged blade
  • 9-12 degree double cutting edge
  • Honbazuke hand finished blade
  • Blade is welded to Japanese-style stainless steel handle
  • Handle has fins for easy grip
  • Made in Seki, Japan
  • 8-inch chef's knife weighs 5.9 ounces.

The Zwilling Twin Fin may be Zwilling's answer to the Global SAI (see our review of Global knives), with its stainless handle and Japanese steel and design. We like this knife just as much as its Global counterpart, and maybe even a little more. For one thing, we like the harder steel--if you're going with a Japanese style knife, you probably want an HRC of at least 60, which this knife has. The Global SAI has a hardness rating of 56-58.

We also really like the curved bolster on this knife, which aids with the all-important pinch grip. And of course, we like the overall looks of the knife: if you're looking for something sleek and modern that will hold up to heavy kitchen use, the Twin Fin is a good choice. 

The blade is also thin like a traditional Japanese knife: just 1.7mm thick at the base of the blade--compare to 3.25mm thick on the Zwilling Pro chef's knife. The thin blade is a joy to use, but not as sturdy as a German-style knife.

Using the Zwilling Twin Fin

This is a light, nimble Japanese style knife, great for fruits, veggies, herbs, meat, and more. The blade is very thin and hard, so it's not for hard foods and bones. If you get the chef's knife, you'll probably also want a tougher Western style chef's knife, or a cleaver, for harder foods/bones.

The blades on all the Twin Fins are narrow, so they're best for Asian-style cutting and not great for the Western rocking motion. 

The edge is very sharp, and should stay that way for a long time before needing to be sharpened.

The balance is superb, giving the knife a light, easy feel while working.

The handle is on the small side, so if you have large hands this might not be a good choice for you. But the organic shape of it is quite comfortable, and not slippery at all, as we thought it might be.

Who Is the Zwilling Twin Fin Knife For?

People who want a hard, lightweight Japanese blade with a modern profile will like the Zwilling Twin Fin. Probably best for people with small to medium sized hands.

Available Knives

The most extensive collection is on the Zwilling site as of this writing, but that may change. The line includes chef's knives, santoku, nakiri, kiritsuke, bread knife, paring knives, steak knives, and more, plus several sets including a small 2 piece chef's/paring knife set (about $150) up to large block sets with self-sharpening blocks, and some cool modern magnetic blocks that take up minimal counter space (see them all on the Zwilling site, starting around $300).

Zwilling Twin Fin 11 piece block set

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Best High End Zwilling Knife: Kramer Euroline Damascus

Zwilling Kramer Euroline Damascus chef's knife
  • SG2 (MC63) micro carbide steel core blade with 100 layer Damascus overlay
  • HRC 63
  • Cryodur hardened blade
  • Forged blade
  • Partial bolster
  • Full tang
  • 9-12 degree double cutting edge
  • 3 step hand finished blade
  • Blade is extra wide for plenty of knuckle clearance
  • Contoured Micarta handle
  • Made in Seki, Japan
  • 8-inch chef's knife weighs 9.7 ounces.

Bob Kramer is an American bladesmith, widely considered to be the best kitchen knife designer in the world. His collaboration with Zwilling produced some of the most beautiful and practical high-end knives on the market.

For this reason, you can't go wrong with any of the Zwilling-Kramer knives, so whichever one you pick has the best of everything: steel, handle design, finishing, and aesthetics. We picked the Euroline Damascus simply because it has the hardest steel (HRC 63 vs. HRC 60/61 on the other Kramers): when you buy a knife like this, you probably want a hard steel. However, any rating of HRC 60 or over is going to be hard, so they really are all great options, with similar handle and bade designs (Kramer knives are quite distinctive).

The Euroline Damascus is also the most expensive of the Kramer knives, so if you can live with a plainer and slightly softer blade, you can get a great Kramer knife for less: The Euroline goes for about $350 and the Meiji goes for about $250--both are beautiful and functional choices.

(The Twin 1731 is also a beautiful, high-end knife that you won't regret buying, but it doesn't have the beauty and distinction of the Kramer knives.)

Kramer knives are made in Seki, Japan, almost certainly in the same factory where Zwilling Miyabi knives are made (see our Miyabi review). They also use some of the same steels as Miyabis and have the same finishing process that provides smooth, rounded edges and a mosaic pin detail that adds a really special touch to these knives.

Using the Zwilling Kramer Euroline Damascus

At more than 9 ounces and with quite a wide blade, the Euroline Damascus is heavier than the other Japanese-inspired Zwilling knives, and even heavier than many of the German Zwilling knives. So before you buy, make sure you want a big, somewhat heavy knife.

But despite its size and weight, this knife is glorious to use. The sharpness and balance are superb and they make the knife feel great in the hand. The handle is thicker than on most Zwilling knives, which you will probably love: Kramer handles have a comfortable grip that most people fall in love with.

The Euroline Damascus is very hard, which means it's brittle, so it's not the right choice for hard foods and bones. If you love the Kramer design and want a more all-around knife, we recommend the standard Euroline or the Meiji. 

Who Is the Zwilling Kramer Euroline Damascus Knife For?

Anyone who loves Kramer and/or Japanese design and can afford a high-end knife should love the Kramer Euroline Damascus. If you want to save a bit yet still get a superb blade, go for the Euroline or Meiji lines. They're all exceptional.

Available Knives

The Kramer Euroline Damascus is available as a chef's knife in four sizes (including a narrower one), santoku, nakiri, carving knife, a few paring and utility knives, a bread knife, and a 7 piece set that goes for about $2000.

For the best selection, see the Zwilling website.

Zwilling Kramer Euroline 2.0 chef's knife

Zwilling Kramer Euroline 2.0.

Zwilling Kramer Meiji chef's knife

Zwilling Kramer Meiji.

Zwillimg Kramer Euroline Damascus chef's knife

Zwilling Kramer Euroline Damascus.

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Best Stamped Zwilling Knife: Zwilling Gourmet/Twin Signature

Zwilling Gourmet chef's knife

Zwilling Gourmet chef's knife.

Zwilling Twin Signature chef's knife

Zwilling Twin Signature chef's knife.

See Gourmet line on Amazon

See Gourmet line at Zwilling

See Twin Signature line Amazon

See Twin Signature line at Sur la Table

See Twin Signature line at Zwilling

8-inch Zwilling Gourmet chef's knife about $70

8-inch Zwilling Twin Signature chef's knife about $90

Features 

Zwilling Gourmet Features

  • German high carbon stainless steel
  • HRC 57
  • Friodur hardened
  • Stamped blade
  • No bolster
  • Full tang
  • 15 degree double cutting edge
  • Laser controlled blade edge for superior sharpness
  • Contoured POM plastic handle
  • Made in Solingen, Germany
  • 8-inch chef's knife weighs 6.8 ounces.

Zwilling Twin Signature Features

  • Zwilling Special Formula High Carbon No Stain steel
  • HRC 57
  • Friodur hardened
  • Stamped blade
  • No bolster
  • Full exposed tang
  • 15 degree double cutting edge
  • Contoured plastic handle
  • Made in Solingen, Germany
  • 8-inch chef's knife weighs about 7 ounces.

We like both of these lines for a budget choice so much that we recommend both of them: they're both made in Germany out of high carbon German steel, the same steel used for many Zwilling forged blades. (Some sources say the knives are made in Germany and China, but the Zwilling site says Germany.) They're both hardened to increase blade strength and the ability to keep a sharp edge. They both have comfortable, contoured plastic handles that keep the price down, but are also hygienic--safe for use in a professional kitchen. It's just a matter of which design you prefer: the Gourmet, which is a pretty standard German-style chef's knife, or the Twin Signature, which has a narrower blade and a handle with a top contour as well as a bottom one (fairly unique among Zwilling knives).

Stamed knives have a reputation for being less strong as forged knives, but Zwilling uses a hardening process to make their stamped blades super strong and able to hold an edge well. Stamped knives have a lighter feel and may be less well balanced as forged knives, but most people won't notice this in daily use unless they're chopping and prepping for hours at a time. 

Using the Zwilling Gourmet/Twin Signature

Both lines are great for basic kitchen cutting and prep work. The steel is soft enough to be great for everything, including hard foods and bone. For a basic knife, either of these lines more than suffice.

The big difference between the two lines is the handles: the Gourmet has a pretty standard Zwilling handle, and the Twin Signature has a rather unique, upwardly curved handle. They're both polymer, with the Twin Signature handle perhaps a little more durable, but they're very similar.

The Gourmet has a more standard blade shape, wider with a bit more room under the handle for knuckle space. The Twin Signature is a flatter blade with less knuckle clearance--it's probably the better choice for small hands, while the Gourmet is better for bigger hands.

The Twin Signature line has more weight in the handle, as well. This is not a fault but it is certainly a personal preference. If you're undecided, try them both before you buy.

Who Is the Zwilling Gourmet/Twin Signature  For?

These are both solid, no-nonsense kitchen knives. They're not fancy, but the steel is strong, the knives are comfortable and well made, and they are a good choice for anyone who's looking for a basic line of kitchen knives at an affordable price.

Available Knives

Both lines have several buying options, including chef's knives, paring knives, bread knives, steak knives, santokus, nakiris, fillet knives, and cleavers, plus several knife sets that top out around $400 for a 19-piece set. 

For the best selection, check the Zwilling website (Gourmet, Twin Signature).

Zwilling Gourmet chef's knife

Zwilling Gourmet chef's knife.

Zwilling Twin Signature chef's knife

Zwilling Twin Signature chef's knife.

buy zwilling gourmet knives:

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Caring for and Sharpening Zwilling Knives

Care: Caring for Zwilling knives is fairly easy. No matter which knives you buy, they should be washed by hand and dried after each washing to prohibit rusting (all steel will rust eventually if not cared for). 

Never put knives in the dishwasher. 

Don't use the Japanese style blades for hard foods or bone. Instead, buy a German-style chef's knife or a cleaver to chop through hard stuff.

Sharpening: As for sharpening, which Zwilling knives you own matters. Most German-style Zwilling knives have a 15 degree double bevel, which means you can sharpen them with just about any pull-through or electric sharpener.

However, Japanese-style Zwilling blades have a much thinner bevel of 9-12 degrees. If you want to maintain these knives properly, you will not want to use most electric or pull-through sharpeners. The best way to keep these knives sharp is with a whetstone or guided rod system. 

Zwilling 4 stage pull-thru sharpener

Zwilling 4-stage pull-through sharpener.

If you don't want to deal with these complicated sharpening methods (and they are a bit complicated with a bit of a learning curve), then you can invest in a Zwilling Japanese blade pull-through sharpener. This 4-stage sharpener has slots for both German blades and Japanese blades. It probably won't achieve the sharpness you'll get on a factory edge Zwilling blade, but it will keep the knives in usable condition. You may want to bring the knives in to be professionally sharpened once a year or so if you're not getting the cutting action you want.

Wusthof Honing Steel

Honing steel.

Also, in addition to sharpening, remember to use a honing steel regularly--a couple of times a week to keep blades smooth and aligned. This increases time between sharpening and is an essential practice to keep your knives in good condition.

This tungsten carbide honing steel from Zwilling is good for both German and harder Japanese steel.

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How to Choose Kitchen Knives (A Buying Guide)

Knife Parts Diagram

This is a basic buying guide for kitchen knives. We'll start with the obvious issues like which knives to buy and how many you need, then drill down into the details, such as knife steel and handles, to look at before buying. 

Sets Vs. Individual Knives

If you need several knives, then a set can be a great to get several knives at once for a lower price. But a set should include the knives you need, and none that you don't. This means the largest set you should get is about six pieces, including a block and a honing steel. A kitchen shears is a nice piece too, although you can usually get better quality steel by buying them separately.

It's definitely smart to get too few knives rather than too many. If you do this you can invest in the knives you know you'll need as you know you need (or want) them. 

Another smart option is to buy a block (or magnetic rack) set with several empty spaces. This way you can keep all your knives together and have the exact set you want as you grow your collection.

Some Zwiling blocks can fit more than one line of Zwilling knife. For example, if you buy a Zwilling Pro block, you can fit Zwilling Gourmet and a few other stamped lines in the Pro slots. This is a nice feature of a large maker such as Zwiling. So if this is important to you, then be sure the Zwilling knives you buy will fit in the block you have.

Which Knives Do You Really Need?

Zwilling Pro chef's knife

Chef's knife (standard German design).

Zwilling Twin Signature paring knife

Paring knife.

Zwilling Kramer Euroline bread knife

Serrated (bread) knife.

The only knife a cook needs for sure is a chef's knife, which is used for prepping meat, vegetables, and herbs. Most also need a paring knife for small work, and a serrated knife for cutting bread: you can do all of these tasks with a chef's knife, but it's not ideal. 

Chef's knives are the most important knife and come in a huge variety of styles and sizes. The standard chef's knife has an 8 inch blade, which is a great size for most cooks. But you can go longer or shorter than this if you prefer. If a chef's knife length isn't given, you can assume it's an 8-inch blade.

Santoku knife

Santoku knife.

Nakiri knife

Nakiri knife.

Chef's knives come in many styles, including standard German shape--tall blade with curved belly, or Japanese shape--narrower blade with flatter belly (or no belly). You can also go with a santoku or nakiri for your daily use chef's knife. There's no wrong answer and it all depends on how you like to use a knife. (Hint: Wider German blades are better for rocking-motion cutting, while most Japanese blades are better for slicing- and chopping-motion cutting. If you don't know the difference, this 6-minute video explains it.)

Most cooks can benefit from having more than one chef's knife, too. You may prefer a longer blade for meats and a shorter blade for veggies, or a santoku blade for veggies and a standard German chef's knife for meats, bones, and hard foods. In fact, if you have a Japanese chef's knife, you will probably need an additional type of chef's knife for hard foods and bone because you can't use your expensive Japanese blade for these things.

You will also have to choose the type of paring knife you prefer. There are several sizes and shapes to choose from. They are used less often than chef's knives and it's not as big a decision, but do try a few designs before you decide which one to buy.

For more about the different types of kitchen knives, see our article How to Choose the Right Kitchen Knives.

Cost

How much do you need to spend for a good quality kitchen knife? Opinions differ on this. Some people say $30 for a decent chef's knife, others say $100, still others say $300. 

The truth is that all of these answers are correct, depending on what you're looking for. You can find decent quality knives at lower price points if you don't mind lower quality handles (such as molded plastic rather than resin, polycarbonate, or wood), stamped blades rather than forged, and steel that will need more frequent sharpening because it's soft (though soft steels are also very durable). 

If you want a forged knife, then you should expect good quality to start at around $100. If you want a stamped knife, then you can get good quality starting around $60--maybe less, depending on handle material, country of origin, and other things.

What do you get for, say, a $300 chef's knife? Well, you get premium steel and premium handle material. The premium steel will be harder and hold an edge longer, and may also have beautiful Damascus patterns on it. But this is a want, not a need, because you can get good quality steel with durable, hygienic handle material for $100 (forged) or less (stamped).

We'll talk more about forged vs. stamped in a minute.

Blade Considerations

What should you look for in a blade on a kitchen knife? The most important factors are: forged vs. stamped; shape and size; balance and weight; type of steel/steel hardness; and cutting edge (also called bevel, angle, or bevel angle, or edge angle).

Forged Vs. Stamped

Forged knife

Forged knife: it has a bolster.

Stamped knife

Stamped knife: no bolster.

Knives are either forged or stamped. There are important differences between them.

A forged knife is formed from a piece of heated steel under great pressure. The blade is thicker at the top and tapers down to a thin edge. Forged knives have a full or partial bolster and typically a full tang--though some forged knives have a partial tang, particularly lighter Japanese knives. (The "tang" is the part of the blade that runs through the handle.)

A stamped knife blade is cut from a steel sheet. It has a uniform thickness throughout the knife (except for the edge, of course), and typically has no bolster and sometimes no tang, although many Zwilling stamped knives have a full tang. Stamped knives are often lighter than forged knives for these reasons, and often don't have the same balance or "feel" when using. 

Forged blades tend to be stronger than stamped blades because the forging process toughens the steel, plus there's a bolster that protects the blade (as well as your fingers). However, many stamped knives today are plenty strong for kitchen use, and the quality is good. Zwilling makes a number of high quality, cryo-hardened stamped knives with a full tang to provide good balance. If you want basic, no-frill kitchen knives, a Zwilling stamped line like the Gourmet or Twin Signature are an excellent choice that should serve you well for decades.

Shape and Size

We already mentioned this in the Which Knives Do You Really Need? section. Every cook needs at least one chef's knife, but the right size and shape varies depending on your preferences and cutting style. For example, the most common chef's knife is eight inches, but you may prefer a smaller or larger one. 

And there are different types of chef's knives, including Japanese chef's knives with a narrow, fairly straight blade, German chef's knives with a wider, steeply curved blade, santokus, and nakiris. All work great as a standard chef's knife, depending on your cutting style, the food you like to cook, and other personal preferences.

Also, remember you may want more than one type or size of chef's knife if you use different cutting techniques for different foods such as slicing for meats and chopping for vegetables. Or, if you want a thin, nimble Japanese knife for vegetables and a heavier, softer knife for harder foods.

The same goes for paring knives, which also come in several varieties and sizes. Though the paring knife is used less frequently, so it's not quite as important as picking out your chef's knife.

How do know the right shape and size you need? The only way to know for sure is to practice with different blades and cutting styles to figure out which ones you prefer. If you are new to cooking, it may take you a few years to figure out the best knives for your cutting style. Starting out with a standard 8-inch chef's knife and a standard paring knife is a good starting point, and you can branch out from there (if you need to).

Zwilling makes a wide variety of knives, so you can try stamped and forged blades, German/Western and Japanese style blades, all in different sizes and shapes. 

Weight and Balance

Some people like a heavier knife, and some people like a lighter knife. There are benefits to both: heavier knives use their weight to cut through foods and are durable kitchen workhorses. Lighter knives are thinner and more nimble, which can speed up the work and make them more fun to use. You just have to try different weights to see what you prefer.

Balance goes hand-in-hand with weight because you want a knife that's balanced in the center area, where the blade meets the handle. Traditionally a bolster is used to create balance, and bolsterless (stamped) knives can sometimes feel like most of the weight is in the blade. An unbalanced blade can be cumbersome to use and create hand strain after a long period of use. (Most Zwilling stamped knives have a full tang, which improves the balance compared to lower quality stamped knives.)

Thus, you want to find knives with good balance and weight that feel good in your hand. It's important to have knives that work with your cutting style and don't drag or pull in an uncomfortable way.

How do you know which knives have the best weight and balance for you? Once again, you just have to try several and see. You might think all knives feel and work pretty much the same, but there is a tremendous difference among them: stamped knives and forged knives have a very different weight and balance, as do German and Japanese knives. And of course, blades of different lengths are also going to feel different (and have a different center of balance).

The only way to know for sure that you've got a knife with the right weight and balance for you is to experiment with different knives.

Type of Steel/Steel Hardness

Steel type is talked about a lot in kitchen knives, but unless you're a knife nerd, you really only need to know whether the steel is German or Japanese, because there are important differences between them.

Nearly all knives made for the home user are made of high carbon stainless steel, which is a rust-resistant steel. German knives are almost all made from the same type of high carbon stainless steel, so if you're buying a German-style knife, there's not a lot more to know.

However, if you're buying a Japanese-style knife, then you have some choices to make. Most modern innovations in kitchen knife steel has occurred in Japanese knives, so they can be made from several types of high carbon stainless steel. 

But even the different types of Japanese steel don't matter all that much, because there's only one thing you really need to know: the hardness of the steel.

In general, Japanese steel is harder than German steel, which means it will hold an edge longer, but is also more brittle, so it can chip more easily. This is why most Japanese knives are not a good choice for hard foods and bone.

German steel is softer, but more durable, which makes it great for all-purpose kitchen use. 

Most German knives have a hardness rating of HRC 56-58. Most Japanese knives have a hardness rating of 60-62.

This may not sound like a big difference, but it can be. For more about the HRC rating, see Rockwell Scale on Wikipedia.

What's the best hardness rating? It really depends on your preferences and what you're using the knife for. A super hard, thin Japanese blade is like a sports car, while a durable German blade is like a reliable sedan that you know will always get you where you're going. They're both good choices, just different ones.

Cutting Edge/Bevel Angle

The cutting edge--also called the bevel, bevel angle, edge, or edge angle--is the angle at which a blade is sharpened.

Most German knives have a 15 degree double bevel, for a total of 30 degrees. Japanese knives can range from a 10 degree double bevel up to a 16 degree double bevel. 

Zwilling German knives have a standard 15 degree double bevel. However, Japanese-style Zwilling knives have a double bevel of 9-12 degrees depending on the line. 

The difference in bevel edge creates a very different feel in how the knife works. Thicker angles are slower and feel less sharp than thinner angles. Thinner angles can feel like you're using a razor blade or scalpel.

They both have their purposes, but the thicker angles are more durable, while the thinner angles are faster and can create more accurate (and artistic) cuts. 

The cutting edge of your knife may not be a huge buying consideration, but it's something you need to know, because it comes into play when the knife needs sharpening. Most pull-through and electric knife sharpeners have a 15 degree double angle because they're designed for Western-style knives. If you have Japanese knives, then you need a sharpener that can do narrower angles. 

We discussed this above in the section on Sharpening, but it bears repeating because if you spend money on Japanese knives, you probably will want to keep the angle they came with. Thus, knowing the cutting edge of the knives you buy is important, especially if you invested in some expensive Japanese blades.

Handle Considerations (Material, Shape, Size)

Handle considerations include handle material, handle shape, and handle size. You also want to make sure a handle doesn't have steel edges, rivets, or pins that cut into your hand. 

A handle can make or break how enjoyable a knife is to use, so these are important considerations when buying a kitchen knife. 

Zwilling makes knives with several handle materials and designs.

Material: The material of the handle determines how comfortable, durable, and hygienic a handle will be. Materials can be plastic, wood, or composites, like pakkawood (resin and wood) or Micarta (cloth, paper, or linen with resin). 

Both plastics and composites tend to be comfortable and hygienic. Wood handles are also very comfortable and beautiful, but can be less hygienic than other handle types: restaurant kitchens do not allow wood-handled knives because they can harbor bacteria. 

Plastic handles come in a wide range of quality, from hard, durable polycarbonate seen on higher end knives to softer plastics seen on lower end knives. In general, plastics make a comfortable handle with a good grip.

Wood handles are typically seen on more expensive knives, mostly because they're beautiful. However, wood also makes an extremely comfortable handle, a little softer than the traditional hard plastics, with a very nice feel in your hand. While hard poly carbonate handles are the most practical, wood handles are certainly the most beautiful.

There's no right or wrong answer (unless you're working in a restaurant kitchen), so you should choose the handle material that you prefer.

Shape: Handles can have a variety of shapes. Most German-style knives have a contoured handle designed to conform to your hand. Japanese knives can have several handle shapes, including round, D-shaped, octagonal, and contoured (like German handles).

Most knife handles feel pretty good regardless of the shape, as they're all designed to create a comfortable, secure grip. D-shaped handles are usually designed specifically for right-handed people, but even so, they can work for left-handed users because the D-shape is subtle and you may not notice it at all if you're not aware of it. 

Thus, most handle shapes will work for most people, as long as the size is right for you...

Size: Probably more important than the handle shape is the handle size. In general, German knives have larger, heavier handles and Japanese knives have smaller, lighter handles. All knife handles should work with most people, but if you have particularly large or small hands, you should be mindful of the size of the handle because it can make a difference in comfort and usability.

Size includes both length and diameter/circumference: some knives have shorter handles than others (Miyabi knives are known for having somewhat short handles), and some knives have thinner handles than others (Global knives have thin handles). Sometimes, thinner handles in particular can cut into your hand. 

Once again, you just need to try different handles and see which ones feel best in your hands. Just because you like the way a knife looks doesn't mean it will work for you. You need to try different handles to make sure you find the one most comfortable for you.

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Zwilling Knives FAQs

Here are some common questions about Zwilling knives, answered.

Where Are Zwilling Knives Made?

Most Zwilling forged and stamped knives are made in Germany, but some of their Japanese-style knives are made in Japan. A few of their stamped lines are made in Spain. The main differences between the higher-end stamped knives and the lower-end stamped knives is the handles, as all Zwilling knives have good quality high carbon stainless steel blades.

We list the country of origin for all Zwilling knives in the tables at the beginning of this review.

Which Zwilling Knives Are Forged?

Diplome, Pro, Pro S, Pro Holm, Professional S, Twin 4 Star, Twin 4 Star II, Twin Fin, Twin 1731, and all the Kramer lines.

Are Zwilling Knives Good Quality?

Yes, Zwilling knives are good quality. They are made with a few different types of steel, but all the steel is some type of high carbon stainless steel. 

Are Zwilling Knives Better than Henckels?

"Better" depends on what you're looking for, but in general, Zwilling knives are considered overall to be higher quality than Henckels knives. This can be confusing sometimes because Zwilling and Henckels are the same company and the labels on Amazon and elsewhere can call a Zwilling knife a "Zwilling J.A. Henckels" knife or even just a Henckels knife, when it is in fact Zwilling. 

The sure way to know if you're buying a true Zwilling knife (rather than a Henckels knife) is by the twin logo on the blade: Zwilling knives have a twin figures on the blade, while Henckels knives have a single figure:

Zwilling logo

Zwilling logo.

Henckels logo

Henckels/Zwilling J.A. Henckels logo.

The logos can be accompanies by different words, but the double figure/single figure is the sure way to know whether you're buying a Zwilling or a Henckels ("Zwilling J.A. Henckels") knife.

What Is the Best Zwilling Knife?

This also depends on what you're looking for. We think the best overall forged Zwilling knife is the Pro, which has a partial bolster for great balance and easy sharpening (rather than any of the full bolster lines). For stamped knives, we like both the Gourmet and the Twin Signature lines because they're made in Germany and yet very reasonably priced. If you go with one of the premium lines, they are all excellent, but we like the Kramer Euroline Damascus for its 63 HRC.

However, as we've said, all the Zwilling lines are good quality, so if you prefer something different than us--a full bolster, a colored handle, different handle material--they are all worthy options.

Are Zwilling Knives Easy to Sharpen?

Ease of sharpening varies by the type of steel: harder steel is harder to sharpen than softer steel. However, standard Zwilling knives of German design--with an HRC of 56-58 and a blade angle of 15 degrees--will be the easiest because you can use any sharpening system for them (most electric sharpeners sharpen to 15 degrees). The Zwilling Japanese style knives will require a sharper angle and will also have harder steel, so you may need to invest in a whetstone or guided rod system to sharpen these well. 

Also, the santoku knives in the German lines have a blade angle of 10 degrees, so if you want to keep this angle, you should invest in a sharpening system for these, as well: anything you buy for Japanese knives will work.

This 4-stage pull-through Zwilling sharpener works for both their German and their Japanese blades (15 degrees and 10 degrees respectively), and is a worthwhile investment if you're looking for the simplest way to keep your knives sharp.

What's the Cuting Angle of Zwilling Knives?

German-design Zwilling knives have a 15 degree double angle.

Exception: German-design Zwilling santokus have a 10 degree double angle.

Japanese design Zwilling knives have a double angle of 9-12 degrees.

This is important information if you want to sharpen your knives properly.

Do Zwilling Knives Rust?

Zwilling knives are made of stainless steel, so they are resistant to rusting. However, even stainless steel will rust if not cared for. This means washing and drying after use--letting the blades sit wet or with food on them is the best way to make them rust.

Can Zwilling Knives Go in the Dishwasher?

Some Zwilling knife handles are made of plastics that are dishwasher safe, but most are not. And even if your knife handles are dishwasher safe, Zwilling (and we) strongly recommend washing all of your cutlery by hand. Dishwasher detergents have abrasive particles that can wreak havoc on knife blades--discoloring them and creating pits and corrosion.

For best results, do not put your Zwilling knives in the dishwasher.

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Final Thoughts on Zwilling Knives

Zwilling Pro 7pc knife block set

Zwilling has been making knives for almost 300 years. They have several lines to choose from, including forged and stamped blades, German and Japanese steels and styles, and everything from budget-friendly plastic handles to top-of-the-line Damascus steel blades and hardwood handles. 

No matter what your price point is, Zwilling has a good quality knife for you: all of their steels are premium quality and cryo-hardened for long lasting sharpness and excellent durability. 

Our favorite Zwilling knife lines are:

  • Pro (forged German style)
  • Twin Fin II (forged Japanese style with steel handle)
  • Kramer Euroline Damascus (high end, super hard blade, and beautiful)
  • Gourmet (stamped German style blade)
  • Twin Signature (stamped German style blade).

We chose these lines for their design and beauty, but if you prefer something different, Zwilling has you covered. All Zwilling knives are high quality, so you can't go wrong whatever you choose. Just make sure the knife is comfortable in your hand and is designed for the type of cutting you do.

Thanks for reading!

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  1. Hey there! I stumbled upon your article about Zwilling Kitchen Knives and I must say, it's an excellent read. As a fellow cooking enthusiast, I appreciate the in-depth review you provided on these knives. Your attention to detail and personal experience with these knives made the article very informative and helpful for anyone looking to purchase a new set of knives for their kitchen.

    One thing that stood out to me was how you discussed the different types of blades and handles, as well as the materials used in creating these knives. I particularly found it helpful that you provided specific examples of each type of knife, such as the chef's knife, paring knife, and utility knife. This made it easier for me to determine which knives I need for my own kitchen and how they can be used effectively. Additionally, the comparison of the different Zwilling knife series was very insightful, as it allowed me to see the differences in quality and price range.

    Overall, your article was very informative and provided a comprehensive guide to Zwilling kitchen knives. I feel much more confident in my decision to purchase a set of these knives for my own kitchen, and I will definitely be referring back to your article for future reference. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and experience with us, and keep up the great work!

    1. Thank you! Glad the article was helpful. We found your link about bamboo cutting boards to be helpful, as well.

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